Marijuana And DUI Lawyer

In recent years with the legalization of marijuana in certain contexts, there has been an increased effort by law enforcement to catch and prosecute those driving under the influence of marijuana and other drugs. Because it is difficult to detect these substances, police often use intimidation and other tactics to get the evidence they need to charge individuals.

Attorney Michael E. Zanol of Wenatchee, Washington, has more than 30 years' experience in criminal and DUI defense. His understanding of testing and the evidence needed to prosecute marijuana DUIs equips him to skillfully defend those facing testing and those who have been charged, defending their constitutional rights.

If you have been arrested for driving under the influence of marijuana, contact a skilled lawyer immediately to protect your rights. Call defense lawyer Michael E. Zanol at 509-872-5113.

Steps In Charging You With A Marijuana Related DUI

Law enforcement will often first look for obvious signs that an individual is high or under the influence of marijuana or some other substance. This includes the smell of marijuana, speech, redness of the eyes and other indicators.

Police officers will often ask the individual to take a field sobriety test, consisting of horizontal gaze exercises, walking forward several steps and turning around to walk back or standing on one leg for a period of time. There has been no scientific evidence, however, to link these exercises to evaluating a person's level of influence. This is a voluntary test and can be refused.

Police will often take the individual to the police station if they feel there is probable cause to suspect the individual of being under the influence of drugs. At the station, they may make you think that you must take a blood test and other physical tests.

If you are over 21 and found with over 5 nanograms of illegal substance in your system, you can receive a DUI. If you are under 21, any amount of illegal substance will result in a DUI.

Unless a warrant has been issued, a blood test must be voluntary and the individual must consent to blood being drawn. The individual must also consent to that blood being tested. If consent is not given and two separate warrants have not been issued for the blood being drawn and the blood being tested, the results are inadmissible and cannot be used against you.

It is important that you ask to speak with your lawyer as soon as possible. This protects you by allowing you to understand your rights and your options without being coerced into making an incriminating statement or consenting to tests that you did not otherwise need to take.